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When is Australia Day 2022 and how is ‘Straya Day’ celebrated? – US Sun

AUSTRALIA DAY has arrived, with Australians everywhere celebrating their national holiday.

Every year, on January 26, Australia marks the day Captain Arthur Philip arrived in the country with a flotilla of British ships – this is how they celebrate.

Fireworks over Sydney Harbor and Opera House on Australia Day 2016

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Fireworks over Sydney Harbor and Opera House on Australia Day 2016Credits: Rex Features

When is Australia Day?

This year, australian dayalso known as Straya Day, is being celebrated on Wednesday, January 26, 2022.

This is a holiday, about national pride and achievement.

Holiday marked by the presentation of Australia Award of the Year on Australian New Year’s Eve (January 25), the Australia Day Honor roll, and speeches by the Governor-General and Prime Minister.

In 2022, a person with a disability was named the 2022 Australian of the Year for the first time – Paralympian tennis champion Dylan Alcott.

In the Australian capital, Canberra, the day is marked by a food, music and fireworks festival in compliance with coronavirus restrictions, a Flag Raising and Naturalization Ceremony.

What is Australia Day celebrated?

Australia Day is the anniversary of the arrival of the 1st Fleet of 11 warships, sent from Britain.

On this day, 1788, the famous Captain Arthur Phillip raised the Union Jack at Sydney Cove – to signal their arrival.

Celebrations have evolved and today people tend to celebrate Australia’s diverse society, national history and community parties.

Why is Australia Day controversial?

Australia’s Independence Day isn’t just about beer and barbecue – for many, it’s a painful reminder of death, disease and a culture that has been virtually wiped out.

The country’s indigenous people mourned on January 26, as tens of thousands of people perished during the colonization of Australia – from disease, starvation and massacre.

Because of this, there are often street protests in major Australian cities.

More and more people are boycotting the celebration and demanding another date be chosen as Australia’s national day.

Despite the strict Covid restrictions in Australia, 2021 is no different – thousands have joined protests against the celebration, wearing face masks and social distancing.

In 2019, Australian Labor Party politician Mark Latham created an advertising campaign comparing the country’s future to a hell on earth where people are not allowed to boast of their national identity. clan for fear of offending someone.

SBS’s report: “In the ad, a girl is seen running to her mother with a hand-drawn ‘Happy Australia Day’ card.

“Her mother was shocked and asked, ‘Have you shown this to anyone else, honey?

“The daughter replied: ‘No, I just can’t do it.’

“In the next scene, the mother is seen passing the card through the shredder.”

It’s a hotly debated topic, with some indigenous groups arguing for a new date and holiday, and others insisting it should stay the status quo.

Every year, Meat and Livestock Australia releases an ad encouraging people to eat lamb on Australia Day, which further heightens tensions among animal rights activists.

How is Australia Day celebrated in the UK?

Most UK celebrations take place in London – where tens of thousands of Australians now live.

Several events have been planned for the day in London, with bottomless Australian food and wine tasting dominating the celebrations.

Other events for Australia Day 2022 available here.

https://www.the-sun.com/news/299576/australia-day-straya-day/ When is Australia Day 2022 and how is ‘Straya Day’ celebrated? – US Sun

DevanCole

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