State of emergency declared after water runs dry and ‘heat dome’ settles over US, bringing temperatures hotter than Sahara’s

THOUSANDS in Texas could be without water for several days as sky-high temperatures scorch the state and bring dangerous conditions.

A water main in the west Texas city of Odessa burst Tuesday morning, leaving over 160,000 residents in and around the area without water for two days.

Thousands of residents in the North Texas city of Odessa could be without running water for two days

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Thousands of residents in the North Texas city of Odessa could be without running water for two daysCredit: AP
Millions in the Midwest and South are facing record temperatures

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Millions in the Midwest and South are facing record temperaturesCredit: AP
Millions of Americans are under

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Millions of Americans are under “heat dome” counselingPhoto credit: The Weather Channel

On Wednesday, the city said the Odessa water treatment plant is in the “recharge phase,” meaning workers are slowly adding water back into the system.

The process allows experts to ensure there are no leaks. The process can take between 12 and 14 hours.

Once the refill is complete, the city will test the water for infections.

But even if water is restored to homes and businesses, people will still need to boil the water before using it for consumption.

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Despite workers’ best efforts, the city said the repairs were “taking longer than expected.”

“The water level has reached a point where a Boil Water Notice has been issued,” the city said.

“Citizens should expect a significant loss of water pressure and/or no water at all. A significant portion of the community remains without water at this time.”

The water main break comes amid scorching conditions in the state as temperatures hit 100 degrees on Tuesday and forecasts for 98 on Wednesday and 96 on Thursday.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott said the state is supporting Odessa, including shipments of bottled water.

Officials are advising residents with running water in their homes to boil it before consuming it to kill bacteria.

A water main burst in Odessa on Tuesday morning, leaving thousands without running water

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A water main burst in Odessa on Tuesday morning, leaving thousands without running waterCredit: AP
The city of Odessa distributes bottled water to residents in need

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The city of Odessa distributes bottled water to residents in needCredit: AP
Much of Illinois, Indiana and parts of Minnesota, Iowa, Michigan and Ohio are on an excessive heat warning

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Much of Illinois, Indiana and parts of Minnesota, Iowa, Michigan and Ohio are on an excessive heat warningCredit: AP

‘HEAT DOME’

Meanwhile, millions in the Midwest and South are preparing for a brutal “heat dome” that will bring record temperatures topping those in the Sahara.

An excessive heat warning is in place for much of Illinois and Indiana, as well as parts of Minnesota, Iowa, Michigan and Ohio.

Heat index values, which take into account temperature and relative humidity and indicate how hot it feels outside, topped 105 degrees in some locations, including Chicago, the National Weather Service said.

Mercury in North Platte, Nebraska, reached 108 degrees, breaking the 1952 record.

St. Louis residents saw temperatures hit 100 degrees.

Charlotte, North Carolina, hit 98 degrees and Nashville, Tennessee was 97 — tying the previous record set in 2016.

“Having an excessive heat warning so early in the year is kind of unusual,” Mike Johnson, meteorologist at the Memphis NWS, told CNN.

“We issue excessive heat warnings maybe once or twice a year. That’s pretty rare because it requires a heat index of 110 degrees.”

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Experts are warning residents about the risks of heat-related illnesses like heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

Forecasters say residents should limit their outdoor activities during the hottest part of the day and stay well-hydrated.

https://www.the-sun.com/news/5566506/water-runs-dry-heat-dome-record-temperatures/ State of emergency declared after water runs dry and ‘heat dome’ settles over US, bringing temperatures hotter than Sahara’s

DevanCole

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