Moment St. Paul’s Cathedral sings “God Save the King” for the first time.

THIS is the spine-chilling moment as “God Save The King” raised the roof of St. Paul’s Cathedral for the first time in seven decades as King Charles III. ascended the throne.

Thousands belted out the King’s version of the national anthem – written in 1745 – during a service in London in honor of the Queen.

Thousands chanted God Save The King during a service in London honoring the Queen who passed away on Thursday

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Thousands chanted God Save The King during a service in London honoring the Queen who passed away on ThursdayPhoto credit: BBC
A picture of the queen stood next to her son at his desk as he addressed the nation for the first time as king

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A picture of the queen stood next to her son at his desk as he addressed the nation for the first time as kingPhoto credit: Reuters

Her Majesty passed away “peacefully” in Balmoral on Thursday with her family at her bedside – the end of a historic 70-year reign.

The Queen’s “long life in the service of this country”, love for her family and commitment to duty were honored at today’s prayer and reflection service.

The public had to queue to get the limited 2,000 bracelets that could enter – these sold out in just three hours.

But the service will be streamed live on BBC One from 6pm for those unable to attend.

Members of the royal family are not present.

But the first speech of King Charles III. as king to the nation was conferred at St. Paul’s and to people around the world.

In it he encouraged those mourning the Queen to “draw strength from the light of her example.”

And in a touching personal message to his late mother, the king said: “And to my beloved mama, as you embark on your final great journey to my dear late papa, I just want to say this: thank you.”

His Majesty continued, “Thank you for your love and devotion to our family and to the family of nations you have served so diligently over the years.

“May swarms of angels sing you to your rest.”

A picture of the Queen, radiant in a blue outfit, sat next to her son as he delivered his maiden speech as King.

The service has seen Dean-elect Andrew Tremlett thanking him for the “Queen’s devotion to all her people”.

As part of the service, the address was given by Dame Sarah Mullally, Bishop of London, Dean of the Chapels Royal.

And the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, delivered the blessing.

Among the well-wishers was Prime Minister Liz Truss, who gave a Bible reading from Romans 14:7-12.

Towards the end of the service, a lone piper played a rousing rendition of “Floo’ers o’ the Forest” as he marched down the aisle at St Paul’s.

The congregation then sang “God Save The King” as the final hymn to close the service.

It is not known who wrote the tune, but it has sometimes been attributed to the composer John Bull.

God Save The Kings is the national or royal anthem of 20 other countries and territories in the Commonwealth.

Hundreds queued outside St Pauls from 3pm this afternoon, snaking their way all the way from St Pauls to behind the tube station which is streets away.

Mourners were elegantly dressed in black suits and ties while others wore black veils as they waited to be seated inside the cathedral.


The death of the Queen comes as…


Thanking the Queen’s service, the Dean-elect said: “We remember her long life spent in the service of this country and her Commonwealth realms around the world.

“We give thanks for a life of devotion to God, their Creator, Redeemer and Sustainer, and devotion to all their people.

“Recalling the promise made at her coronation that all her judgments should be governed by law, justice and mercy, we rejoice at her continued acceptance of that calling.

“We celebrate her love for her family, her commitment to duty and her calling to create unity and harmony at the heart of the Commonwealth.

“We pray for the royal family as they mourn their loss.

“We also pray for our most gracious Sovereign Lord the King, that he too, putting all his trust in God, may rule over us in peace, with justice and compassion.”

Those members of the public lucky enough to get a bracelet had to queue outside the City of London Tourist Office – only one bracelet was issued to each person.

The King thanked his late mother, the Queen, for the service she had rendered to the country

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The King thanked his late mother, the Queen, for the service she had rendered to the country
Dame Sarah Mullally, Bishop of London, delivered the address as Dean of the Chapels Royal

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Dame Sarah Mullally, Bishop of London, delivered the address as Dean of the Chapels RoyalPhoto credit: Reuters
Members of the public reflected on the Queen's life during the service

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Members of the public reflected on the Queen’s life during the servicePhoto credit: Getty
The public had to queue to get their hands on the limited 2,000 bracelets, which sold out in just three hours

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The public had to queue to get their hands on the limited 2,000 bracelets, which sold out in just three hoursCredit: PA
Prime Minister Liz Truss looked deeply thoughtful as she joined the community on Friday

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Prime Minister Liz Truss looked deeply thoughtful as she joined the community on FridayCredit: PA
Dean-elect Andrew Tremlett expressed his thanks for the Queen "devotion to all her people"

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Dean-elect Andrew Tremlett expressed his gratitude for the Queen’s ‘devotion to all her people’Photo credit: BBC

https://www.the-sun.com/news/6187891/queen-service-st-pauls-god-save-the-king/ Moment St. Paul’s Cathedral sings “God Save the King” for the first time.

DevanCole

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