Lifestyle

It took me years to embrace my curly hair – I used to use an iron to straighten it

Worried with nerves in the lounge chair, I knew it was time for the “big hack”.

I was 18 years old and envisioned my new short, bouncy hair when the hairdresser cut off the ends of my dry, frizzy hair.

Keshia said:'Growing up, it took me a while to embrace my hair. I am of mixed race, born to a white British father and a black African mother'

4

Keshia said: ‘Growing up, it took me a while to embrace my hair. I am of mixed race, born to a white British father and a black African mother’Credit: catherine harbour
Keshia at her graduation in 2013 with her sister pop star Fleur

4

Keshia at her graduation in 2013 with her sister pop star Fleur

But a few days later, when I washed it and set it back to its natural state, I realized how awful it looked.

My tight curls started working again and lengthened so that my hair was at ear level.

It’s too bad.

But after the initial shock, my new healthy hair thanked me for it – and this was the start of a new journey.

A journey that now many others are taking.

Lockdown applauded the curling movement, as breaks from hot tools saw many rediscover their natural textures, leading to the hashtag #Quarantine Curls becoming popular.

Celebrities are starting to let loose their waves, with Khloe Kardashian being the latest to reveal that she’s left her hair down too.

And actress Gabrielle Union, who starred in the 2000 film Bring It On, has revealed how she went from “hating” her natural hair to embracing it with “strength” and “diversity.” form”.

As a result, business for curly hair care brands has skyrocketed.

London-based Only Curls has reported 300% growth year-on-year, and in the first 10 days of 2022, order numbers hit TRIPLE compared to this time last year.

Founder Lizzie Carter founded Only Curls to encourage people to limit the use of straighteners every day.

Growing up, it took me a while to hug my hair. I am of mixed race, born to a white British father and a black African mother.

Neither of my parents believed in my hair care at all.

It would go super curl with no product when my dad did it, or oversaturate with products and braid it back when my mom walked in.

It’s rare that I wear the curls I was born with.

In the end, my mom decided to let her hair down when I was seven – my hair was treated with chemicals to make it permanent.

By the age of 13, I was in power. I stopped relaxing it but continued to straighten it.

I’ll use the weirdest things, from trying to blow dry myself (which never works) to using an iron to smooth it out – yes, an iron.

My sister – X Factor singer Fleur East – also tried this.

We put a sheet or towel on the floor then we comb each other’s hair in sections.

We put a sheet or towel on the floor then we comb each other’s hair in sections.

Keshia East

I’ve never disliked my naturally curly hair, but people have commented on it.

When Eamonn Holmes said he wanted to “strove” Dr Zoe Williams’ hair on ITV’s This Morning and called it “alpaca-ish”, it reminded me of the number of times complete strangers want to touch it. I.

“Once, someone asked me: ‘Where do you buy your hair? “

I replied, “Mother’s womb.” What did I have to say to that?

Many others also assumed that my naturally curly hair was a wig.

Eamonn’s fellow presenter Dermot O’Leary also made the mistake on This Morning when he asked co-host Alison Hammond how she “gets those curls”.

Alison replied: ‘It’s a wig. This is a protective style.

“When I want to protect my hair for a while, I braid it underneath and attach these to it. It’s not even real hair, it’s synthetic.”

But we don’t have to tell everyone that our hair is natural or not, do we?

While we must learn to care for our hair, we must also educate others.

Thankfully, things are changing.

Fifteen years ago, there weren’t any curls in mainstream retail stores, and there wasn’t much information online about how to take care of it.

So it was difficult to know what to do – and I was a bit distracted.

The availability of products that work for my hair at high street stores like Boots and Superdrug has completely changed my relationship with my hair.

Taking care of my naturally curly hair is no longer a chore but a self-care ritual and I have never loved it more than now.

Keshia East

My favorite for years is the Boots Essentials Curl Cream (£1.99).

Now, I spend a lot of time nurturing it.

I wash it on average once every two weeks.

This may not seem like much but it is a complete process. Add more and I find it too dry.

First, I would pre-treat the hair using oil or shampoo first, which is what you do first to get extra moisture.

I wash and condition my hair before parting, because curly hair is more prone to frizz.

If I had time, I would steam with a hair mask then rinse and style with products.

Then I refresh my hair every two to three days by re-wetting and applying more product to keep curls fresh and healthy hair.

I absolutely love my curls now and wouldn’t let them go any other way.

Mine The story proves that inclusivity in the retail space is important.

My experiences also led me to start my own hair tools company, No Knot Co, which offers brushes specifically designed for curls.

Taking care of my naturally curly hair is no longer a chore but a self-care ritual and I have never loved it more than now.

Curly hair rule

Understanding different hair textures also means understanding the language around it, says Keshia.

There are many things that convey hidden, and often offensive, messages. This is her rule. . .

  1. DO compliment me on my hair. It feels great when people appreciate and compliment it.
  2. DO ask questions if you’re really curious about the texture of my hair. For example, how do you style it? What is your favorite product? A lot of people ask on behalf of their friends or children. I love sharing my hair tips and tricks.
  3. DO NOT touch my hair without my permission. You wouldn’t want a stranger touching your face or body – the same goes for hair.
  4. DON’T ask if my hair is real or fake. If my hair were natural, you would think my hair looks fake. If my hair were fake, I wouldn’t necessarily tell you this in front of so many people. This can be frustrating both ways.
  5. DO NOT compare my hair to animals or negative things. For example, a Brillo pad, mop head, toilet brush, poodle, alpaca, or lion. This is my natural hair texture, so don’t be offensive.
  6. DON’T tell me how much better my straight hair looks. Sometimes I like to keep my hair straight, but please don’t tell me it suits me much better than going natural.

… curly head

AVOID WITH SULPHATES: These substances are found in many shampoos and can strip your hair of its natural oils, causing it to become frizzy.

This can also cause tangles and knots.

There are great sulphate-free options out there – try Creme Of Nature’s argan oil shine & moisture shampoo (£4.99, Superdrug).

HYDRAULIC CREAM: Most curly hair types can be prone to dryness, so it’s important that you have moisture in your shampoo.

Aveeno Almond Oil Blend Shampoo (£8.99, Boots) moisturizes hair and scalp.

You can replace your shampoo entirely with one wash – a shampoo and conditioner combo – if it’s particularly dry.

Or use it between washes every two weeks.

My favorite is As I Am Dry & Itchy Co wash (£10.99, cchairandbeauty.com).

PRIOR SHAMPOO: If you have an overly dry scalp or dry hair in general, try using an oil or butter before shampooing.

I recommend Flora & Curl African citrus essential oil (£21.99, Superdrug).

PROTEIN: If you find your hair is prone to breakage, chemical damage, or feels mushy, washing your hair with protein once a month can help.

It can reduce breakage, prevent split ends, and make your hair overall stronger.

Try Vichy Dercos Nutritional Protein Shampoo (£11, lookfantastic.com).

DANGER WHEN EVENING: Since curly hair has a lot of volume, it can also be difficult to see knots that have formed.

Protect curls by only coming out when wet.

Using a Lilac detector (£15, noknot.co).

SATIN ACCESSORIES: Always sleep with a silk/satin pillowcase or a hair hood to avoid knots and retain moisture.

Try the satin bonnet (£16, onlycurls.com).

Keshia looks happy again with her padlock

4

Keshia looks happy again with her padlock
Three years old Keshia

4

Three years old Keshia
Keshia East, Fab’s esthetician, tries ‘slugging’

https://www.the-sun.com/lifestyle/4451689/embrace-curly-hair-six-rules/ It took me years to embrace my curly hair – I used to use an iron to straighten it

PaulLeBlanc

Daily Nation Today is an automatic aggregator of the all world’s media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – admin@dailynationtoday.com. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.

Related Articles

Back to top button