I’m a small business owner, the rail strikes have already cost me £50,000 – it’s crippling us all

WHAT planet does leftist arsonist Angela Rayner live on?

In a bizarre statement yesterday about the dramatic escalation of rail strikes over the holiday, Labor Deputy Leader said militant union leader Mick Lynch had been “incredibly reasonable” during the row.

Mick Lynch and his Rail, Maritime and Transport Union cronies ruthlessly use their muscles to create widespread misery for their own selfish purposes

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Mick Lynch and his Rail, Maritime and Transport Union cronies ruthlessly use their muscles to create widespread misery for their own selfish endsCredit: PA
What planet does leftist arsonist Angela Rayner live on? Labor Deputy Leader said militant union leader Mick Lynch was

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What planet does leftist arsonist Angela Rayner live on? Labor Deputy Leader said militant union leader Mick Lynch was “incredibly reasonable” during the rowPhoto credit: Getty Images – Getty

She couldn’t be more wrong. Far from showing restraint, Mick Lynch and his cronies at the Rail, Maritime and Transport Union are ruthlessly using their brawn to create widespread misery for their own selfish ends.

Their methods are as cruel as their timing. Christmas is supposed to be a time of goodwill, but for the RMT’s cynical tyrants it’s an opportunity to trick the British public into demanding ransom and blackmailing the railway companies.

real damage

Lynch is a throwback to the dark days of the 1970s, when union bosses paralyzed the country with their extravagant wage demands and frenzy of walkouts.

His entire approach is based on deceit and contempt. Just a few weeks ago, in order to create some semblance of reconciliation, he promised that there would be no industrial action over Christmas.

Now he has gone back on his word without the slightest justification. Equally misleading are his empty expressions of regret at the impact of the strikes when he claims that the RMT was “forced” into this drastic course by the stubbornness of management and the government.

His argument is worthless. The strikes are entirely the work of his union and those who suffer most from his militancy are ordinary workers who have to fight for their jobs or who are unable to see their families over Christmas because of the RMT.

I hope he reads the stories of such people on this site.

At a time when the country is gripped by a cost-of-living crisis, the union’s stubbornness is doing serious damage, particularly in the hospitality sector, for which this is the busiest time of the year.

It is estimated that next week’s strikes alone will cost the economy £1.7 billion. Some employees understandably fear losing their livelihoods when business failures and cutbacks are caused by the irresponsibility of Lynch’s mob.

The union’s pose as a warrior against oppression would be ridiculous if it weren’t so offensive. With an average salary of £44,000, railway workers are paid far better than most other occupations and enjoy longer holidays, shorter working hours, better job security and far higher pensions.

The salary offer Lynch just turned down can hardly be described as ridiculous, as it includes a five percent increase backdated to January, four percent next year, and other perks.

The union is also bitter in its opposition to much-needed changes across the network. Wary of new technology, the RMT has struggled to preserve inflexible steam-age practices.

For this reason, neither the government nor the rail operators should give in to Lynch. Without real reforms, any lavish new tariff regulation would just be money down the drain. Soon the RMT fighters would be back for more.

The best hope for their defeat is that public opinion will turn against them. Announcing a new wave of strikes this week could help achieve just that.

“INDUSTRY NEEDS A BREAK”

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PARTY organizers Kamran Dehdashti and Jamie Hazeel have already lost £50,000 after customers canceled parties due to train strikes.

The couple runs Little Door, which has four venues in London specializing in house and dinner parties.

Kamran says: “Christmas is absolutely massive for us. The four weeks from late November to December 18 are huge. The employees are also dependent on tips and double-shift tariffs. It is truly an important time for our industry.

“I understand the reasons for the strike but the timing really bothers me. It’s one thing to support them on strike, but when it affects everyone else so much, it’s another.

“This industry just needs a break. There were days when we had bookings for hundreds of people that are now empty.”

“parties cancel”

The Valley Curry House is by the train station in Corbridge, Northumberland and the train strike has resulted in many parties canceling bookings

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The Valley Curry House is by the train station in Corbridge, Northumberland and the train strike has resulted in many parties canceling bookingsPhoto credit: North News & Pictures, Newcastle

DARAZ AZIZ owns The Valley Curry House by the train station in Corbridge, Northumberland, and the train strike has brought its darkest days in 30 years.

The restaurant is well known for its Passage To India excursions from Newcastle Central Station, where diners are greeted on the platform by waiters and order on the way to the restaurant.

More than half of his customers travel by train and many have already canceled parties because of the strike.

Daraz, 66, says: “We had a lot of big parties booked for December which have now had to be cancelled, and it’s only going to get worse.

“We’ve been in business since 1991 and this is the toughest time we’ve ever experienced. It is really worrying and very disappointing.”

“ACTION PROTECTS BUYERS”

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INDEPENDENT toy store QT Toys is based near the UK’s busiest railway station, London’s Clapham Junction, where it has been operating since 1983.

Sales manager Josh Jewkes, 32, says: “We were all together in Covid and I’d like to think we’re all together now, but the strikes just seem unfair and considerate to others.

“It’s frustrating that everything is going to stop and people will suffer as a result. Unfortunately, trade will be affected. The strikes are particularly affecting businesses near Clapham Junction as it is such a busy station.

“We had hoped that after the restricted movement of Covid last Christmas we could now be back to normal. But people were already hesitant to spend and now train strikes will keep them from shopping.”

“A third of the revenue lost”

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“When there’s a strike people don’t come in and we lose about a third of our revenue, which takes a huge toll on us,” says pub proprietor Sam Omerod

PUB hosts Robb and Sam Ormerod have been running the Beer Shack in Clitheroe, Lancs since April and the rail strike days have cut their revenue by a third.

The couple take around £60,000 a year in wages from the pub – the average salary of a train driver.

Robb, 45, says: ‘We’re hit hardest by the weekend strikes. Every time a train pulls into the station, a lot of people come in for a drink and it’s on the weekends that we make the most money.

“We get customers coming in from all over the North West, which is what we need as we can’t survive on local trade.

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“When there’s a strike people don’t come in and we lose about a third of our revenue, which weighs heavily on us.

“It affects all small businesses, from the market trader to the small shops.”

https://www.the-sun.com/news/6857906/small-business-owner-rail-strikes/ I’m a small business owner, the rail strikes have already cost me £50,000 – it’s crippling us all

DevanCole

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