World

I had to fight for my life after being burned by one of the most dangerous creatures in the world

A BRIT has had to fight for life after being burned by one of the world’s deadliest creatures during a dream holiday in Australia.

James Soale, 22, enjoyed a dip on the seabed when he came in contact with a dead Irukandji jellyfish.

James Soale, 22, and his girlfriend Savannah Callaghan, 23, were enjoying a dip in the song Down Under when he was burned

5

James Soale, 22, and his girlfriend Savannah Callaghan, 23, were enjoying a dip in the song Down Under when he was burnedCredit: Triangle News
He had to fight for his life after swimming on March 8

5

He had to fight for his life after swimming on March 8Credit: Triangle News
Tiny but terrifying Irukandji jellyfish can cause fatal brain hemorrhage

5

Tiny but terrifying Irukandji jellyfish can cause fatal brain hemorrhageCredit: Triangle News

The killer sea creature – known for its distinctive sting that can cause devastating brain hemorrhages – is so small that visitors have not seen it.

He told how he suddenly felt “electric shock” while swimming at Palm Cove beach, Queensland, with his girlfriend Savannah Callaghan, 23, on March 8.

The couple enjoyed the holiday of a lifetime after a six-week Australian tour when they visited the beach to cool off.

But their quick swim in the ocean quickly turns to sin – when James is rushed to intensive care, breathing difficulties and chest pain.

Medics managed to neutralize the deadly venom when a frightened Savannah prayed for James to pass.

The couple spoke today about how James endured a brain haemorrhage wound, despite swimming in an area with nets shielding him.

They heeded the warnings of jellyfish and crocodiles at the picturesque beach, but the 22-year-old still suffered a painful sting on his left arm.

Wedding photographer James, from Kingston-Upon-Thames, Surrey, told The Sun: “It felt like an electric shock.

“I suspect it is a jellyfish but I don’t know which one, how dangerous it is.

“I managed to free myself before the pain became too severe and I told lifeguards, who quickly evacuated everyone from the sea.

“It was a terrifying and excruciatingly painful time. I never had anything like that happen to me before,” he recalls.

“The lifeguards later found three of these jellyfish in the netting area where we were swimming.”

Irukandji jellyfish – which are only 1-2cm in size – have the unique ability to shoot venom from the tips of their tentacles and inject venom.

Their stings are so severe that they can cause fatal brain hemorrhages and an average of 50-100 people are hospitalized each year in Australia.

James was closely monitored in the hospital for 10 hours until he felt better after doctors injected him with life-saving drugs.

He continued: “Now, ten days later, I feel a little better, we did our research on jellyfish and now I know I have a very lucky escape.

Ten days later, I feel a little better, we did some research on jellyfish and now I know I’m lucky to have survived.

James Soale

“After looking at them and where they’re most likely, we’ve been trying to avoid them and I’m slowly but surely getting back into the country again.”

However, a day after being discharged from Cairns Central Hospital, James had to return, again struggling to breathe.

Concerned girlfriend Savannah, said of the ordeal: “We went to the hospital and the venom leaked into James’ heart.

“The doctors were concerned he might have had a cardiac arrest but after about 10 hours there and giving him medication, he was stable.”

Irukandji jellyfish venom causes severe muscle cramps, severe pain in the back and kidneys, a burning sensation, and even a psychological phenomenon that creates a feeling of impending doom.

But miraculously, two weeks after combing his hair with death, James made a full recovery – and was even back in the water.

The 22-year-old and Savannah are now making the most of their final weeks in Australia before they return home on April 1.

According to Whitsunday Regional Council, only about 100 Irukandji stings each year in Queensland require medical treatment.

Surf Life Saving Queensland says marine stingers are designed to keep box jellyfish out, but Irukandji can still get through.

The website recommends leaving water on if an individual is stung, soaking the area in vinegar, and seeking medical attention if severe symptoms appear.

The 22-year-old player had difficulty breathing after being pricked by a needle in his left arm

5

The 22-year-old player had difficulty breathing after being pricked by a needle in his left armCredit: Triangle News
James and Savannah visited Palm Cove Beach in Queensland

5

James and Savannah visited Palm Cove Beach in QueenslandCredit: Triangle News

https://www.the-sun.com/news/4899110/brit-fighting-for-life-stung-worlds-deadliest-creatures/ I had to fight for my life after being burned by one of the most dangerous creatures in the world

DevanCole

Daily Nation Today is an automatic aggregator of the all world’s media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – admin@dailynationtoday.com. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.

Related Articles

Back to top button