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Food stamps 2022 update – $870 extra one-time SNAP payments to be sent out as $95 boosts also on the way

THOUSANDS of Americans will receive an extra, one-time payment to help cover expenses including food and diapers.

Nearly 155,000 struggling families will receive the $870 extra in cash, as $95 boosts are also on the way.

New York Governor Kathy Hochul announced on Tuesday that the state will provide more than $64million in funding for residents with children, survivors of domestic violence, multi-generational households, and other struggling households, as part of the state’s Pandemic Emergency Assistance Fund.

Around 41million people across the country receive SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) benefits, worth up to $1,504 a month.

Food stamps are designed to help low-income households when it comes to buying groceries.

The states that have extended emergency SNAP benefits this month are: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, District of Columbia, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Residents must apply for SNAP in the state where they currently live.

Read our food stamps live blog for the latest news and updates…

  • $157 increase

    The average food stamp benefit was increased to $157 per person on October 1.

    Below is a list of states that will extend the benefit through February 2022, alongside the District of ColumbiaGuam and Virgin Islands.

  • Extra funds for SNAP

    These extra funds were set to help an estimated 25million people in low-income households struggling to put food on the table due to the pandemic.

    They were initially set to expire in September 2021. However, many states have continued to provide this resource.

  • 33 states offering extra benefits 

    Millions of food stamp claimants are once again getting an automatic benefit boost as a majority of states have extended their support for February.

    In April 2021, USDA announced that the federal government would provide an extra $1billion per month to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).

    This program is also more widely known as food stamps.

  • Your P-EBT card

    For more detailed instructions this video here provides more information on how best to choose and create the pin for your P-EBT card.

    This debit card allows you to shop at most places that accept Cal Fresh food benefits, these include a variety of grocery stores, various different farmers markets.

    P-EBT cards may also be accepted online at certain stores such as Amazon and Walmart.

  • The minimum extra amount, continued

    The $95 increase was scheduled to expire on September 30, 2021; however, some states have extended the monetary support.

    These funds provide an increase in benefits to an estimated 25million people in low-income households that are struggling to put food on the table due to the continuation of the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • How are P-EBT food benefits issued?

    The SNAP Covid-19 information noted that “P-EBT food benefits will be issued as monthly in-person school attendance information provided by schools and school districts is reviewed and processed”

    Those eligible for the P-EBT program will receive a debit card in the mail. Once you have received the card you must create a pin.

    You can call the helpline at  1-888-328-6399 to select a pin.

  • Can I get SNAP if I have children?

    The SNAP benefits are not exclusive to those who have children.

    The benefits are available to people of all types: single, married, seniors, working people, and families.

  • Items you can’t purchase with SNAP

    There are a variety of items you can’t use your EBT card to purchase.

    • Beer, wine, liquor, cigarettes, or tobacco
    • Vitamins, medicines, and supplements.
    • Live animals (except shellfish, fish removed from water, and animals slaughtered prior to pick-up from the store)
    • Foods that are hot at the point of sale

    You also won’t be able to buy non-food items such as:

    • Pet foods
    • Cleaning supplies, paper products, and other household supplies
    • Hygiene items, cosmetics
  • What can I buy with an EBT card?

    You can use your SNAP benefits to buy:

    • Fruits and vegetables
    • Meat, poultry, and fish
    • Dairy products
    • Breads and cereals
    • Other foods, such as snack foods and non-alcoholic beverages
    • Seeds and plants, which produce food for the household to eat
  • States seeing increases, continued

    Additional states may choose to acknowledge a benefits extension for February.

    The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) provided a list of the 36 states that opted to extend benefits, and when residents in each state can expect to receive their funds.

  • Which states are seeing increases?

    A total of 36 states extended emergency SNAP benefits in January while the Covid pandemic continues throughout the country.

    The emergency assistance funds will go to households receiving close to or the full maximum benefit.

    So even a family of four receiving $835, the maximum benefit level, will receive an additional $95 in emergency funds.

  • California’s response to SNAP audit

    Elaine Howle, who performed the audit, made a handful of recommendations regarding the funding.

    “CDSS has effectively overseen the distribution of additional SNAP payments and it initially succeeded in quickly distributing P-EBT payments during the early months of the pandemic,” wrote Mrs. Howle.

    “However, CDSS has not delivered additional P-EBT payments in a timely manner.

    “Families have had to wait an average of more than 200 days to receive payments that replaced missed meals from school year 2020–21. 

    “CDSS could reduce the risk that families unknowingly miss out on P-EBT payments by notifying schools when families do not use their payments and encouraging schools to follow up with those families.”

  • California audit reveals millions unused

    An audit last year of California revealed that $182million in pandemic-related food assistance has gone unused.

    Reports indicate that as many as 500,000 benefits cards went unused during the 2019-2020 school year.

    The audit was performed by California state and analyzed the use of federal funds by the California Department of Social Services.

    The two food aid programs in question are the Pandemic Electronic Benefit Transfer (P-EBT) cards and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), which is more commonly called food stamps.

    In California, SNAP is also known as CalFresh.

  • Expedited stamps: who qualifies

    Many states including New York, Oregon, and Texas have similar eligibility requirements.

    To qualify for the expedited food stamps in those states, your gross earnings for the month must be less than $150.

    Also, your liquid resources cannot exceed $99.

    Some migrants and seasonal farmworkers may be eligible to get the stamps as well.

    The amount you get in benefits will depend on your state.

  • Difference between regular and expedited stamps

    The expedited stamps are used the same way ordinary food stamps are – with the use intended to help those in need pay for meals.

    The only difference is how quickly they arrive.

    Most food stamps arrive within 30 days of when states begin to process your application – but the expedited ones might arrive within the five days depending on how quickly the state can issue them.

  • SNAP benefits by state, part 10

    Utah

    Benefits are made available on the fifth, 11th, or 15th of every month, based on the first letter of the client’s last name.

    Vermont

    Benefits are made available on the first of every month.

    Virginia

    Benefits are made available from the first to the 7th of every month, based on the last digits of the client’s case number.

    Washington

    Benefits are made available from the first to the 20th of every month.

    Washington, DC

    Benefits are made available from the first to the 10th of every month, based on the first letter of the client’s last name.

    West Virginia

    Benefits are made available over the first nine days of every month, based on the first letter of the client’s last name.

    Cash benefits are made available on the first calendar day of every month.

    Wisconsin

    Benefits are made available over the first 15 days of every month, based on the eight-digit of the client’s SSN.

    Wyoming

    Benefits are made available from the first to the fourth of every month, based on the first letter of the client’s last name.

  • SNAP benefits by state, part 9

    Rhode Island

    Benefits are made available on the first day of every month.

    South Carolina

    Benefits are made available from the first to the 10th of every month based on the last digit of the SNAP case number.

    South Dakota

    Benefits are made available on the 10th day of every month.

    Tennessee

    Benefits are made available based on the last two digits of the head of the household’s Social Security number.

    Texas

    SNAP households certified after June 1, 2020, benefits are available on a staggered basis between the 16th and the 28th day of the month, based on the last two digits of the eligibility determination group number.

    SNAP households certified before June 1, 2020, benefits are made available over 15 days, beginning on the first and based on the last digit in the eligibility determination group number.

  • SNAP benefits by state, part 8

    North Carolina

    Benefits are made available from the third to the 21st of every month, based on the last digit of the primary cardholder’s SSN.

    North Dakota

    Benefits are made available on the first day of every month.

    Ohio

    Benefits are made available for the above individuals from the second to the 20th of every month, based on the last digit of the client’s SNAP case number.

    Oklahoma

    Benefits are made available from the first to the 10th of every month, based on the last digit of the client’s SNAP case number.

    Oregon

    Benefits are made available from the first to the ninth of every month, based on the last digit of the client’s SSN.

    If there is no SSN, such as parents applying on behalf of their US citizen children, the benefits are made available on the first of the month.

    Pennslyvania

    Benefits are made available over the first 10 business days of the month, excluding weekends and holidays, based on the last digit of the seven-digit case record number.

  • SNAP benefits by state, part 7

    Nevada

    Benefits will be made available over the first 10 days of every month, based on the last digit of the household’s birth year number.

    New Hampshire

    Benefits are made available on the fifth of every month.

    New Jersey

    Benefits are made available over the first five calendar days of the month, based on the seventh digit of the client’s case number.

    New Mexico

    Benefits are made available over 20 days every month, based on the last two digits of the Social Security number.

    New York

    Benefits are generally made available based on the last digit of the client’s case number. For all counties, except the five boroughs of New York City (NYC).

    For NYC cases, benefit postings are spread out over 13 different days that are not Sundays or holidays, during the first two weeks of each month.

    The actual dates change from one month to the next, so NYC publishes a six-month schedule showing the exact availability dates.

  • SNAP benefits by state, part 6

    Minnesota

    Benefits are made available from the fourth to the 13th of every month, based on the last digit of the client’s case number.

    Mississippi

    Benefits are made available from the fourth to the 21st of every month, based on the last two digits of the client’s case number.

    Missouri

    Benefits are made available over the first 22 days of every month, based on the client’s birth month and last name.

    Montana

    Benefits are made available over five days, beginning with the second calendar day of every month, based on the last digit of the SNAP eligibility system case number.

    Nebraska

    Benefits are made available from the first to the fifth of every month, based on the last digit of the head of household’s SSN.

  • SNAP benefits by state, part 5

    Louisiana

    Benefits are made available between the first and the 23rd of every month, based on the last digit of the client’s Social Security number.

    Elderly and disabled benefits are available between the first and the fourth of the month.

    Maine

    Benefits are made available from the 10th to the 14th of every month, based on the last digit of the recipient’s birthday.

    Maryland

    Benefits are made available from the fourth to the 23rd of the month, based on the first three letters of the client’s last name.

    Massachusettes

    Benefits are made available over the first 14 days of every month, based on the last digit of the recipient’s SSN.

    Michigan

    Benefits are made available from the third to the 21st of every month, based on the last digit of the recipient’s ID number.

  • SNAP benefits by state, part 4

    Illinois

    Benefits are made available for households between the first and the 10th based on the month previously set by the last digit of the Head of Household Individual ID number.

    Indiana

    Benefits are made available from the fifth to the 23rd of every month, based on the first letter of the client’s last name.

    Iowa

    Benefits are made available over the first 10 calendar days of every month, based on the first letter of the client’s last name.

    Kansas

    Benefits are made available over the first 10 calendar days of every month, based on the first letter of the client’s last name.

    Kentucky

    Benefits are made available over the first 19 calendar days of every month, based on the last digit of the client’s case number.

  • SNAP benefits by state, part 3

    Florida

    Benefits are made available from the first to the 28th of every month, based on the ninth and eighth digits of the Florida case number (READ BACKWARDS), dropping the 10th digit.

    Cash benefits are made available on the first through the third day of every month.

    Georgia

    Benefits are made available from the fifth to the 23rd of every month, based on the last two digits of the client’s ID number.

    Hawaii

    Benefits are made available on the third and the fifth of every month, based on the first letter of the client’s last name.

    Idaho

    Benefits are made available over the first 10 days of every month, based on the last digit of the client’s birth year number.

  • SNAP benefits by state, part 2

    California

    Benefits are made available over the first 10 days of every month, based on the last digit of the client’s case number.

    Colorado

    Benefits are made available from the first to the 10th of every month, based on the last digit of the recipient’s SSN.

    Cash benefits are made available from the first to the third of every month, based on the last digit of the recipient’s SSN.

    Connecticut

    Benefits are made available from the first to the third of every month, based on the first letter of the client’s last name.

    Delaware

    Benefits are made available over 22 days, beginning with the second day of every month, based on the first letter of the client’s last name.

  • SNAP benefits by state, part 1

    Alabama

    Benefits are made available from the fourth to the 23rd of every month, based on the last two digits of the client’s case number.

    Alaska

    Benefits are made available on the first day of every month.

    Arizona

    Benefits are made available over the first 13 calendar days of the month, based on the first letter of the client’s last name.

    Arkansas

    Benefits are made available over eight days, between the fourth and the 13th of every month, based on the last digit of the client’s Social Security number (SSN).

https://www.the-sun.com/money/4659488/food-stamps-2022-increased-snap-payments-update/ Food stamps 2022 update – $870 extra one-time SNAP payments to be sent out as $95 boosts also on the way

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