World

Ex-cricket star Imran Khan became Pakistan’s prime minister after losing no-confidence vote

PAKISTAN Prime Minister Imran Khan has been ousted from power after losing a dramatic vote of no confidence in his leadership.

The vote came after opposition parties filed a motion against him, which was upheld by the country’s Supreme Court.

Imran Khan found himself on a sticky wicket when it came to leading Pakistan

4

Imran Khan found himself on a sticky wicket when it came to leading PakistanCredit: EPA
Supporters of the opposition parties chant anti-Khan slogans in front of the parliament building

4

Supporters of the opposition parties chant anti-Khan slogans in front of the parliament buildingPhoto credit: AFP

The former cricket star had said he would not recognize an opposition government and claimed – without evidence – that there was a US-led conspiracy to remove him.

He claims the US government wants him to go because of his foreign policy decisions in favor of Russia and China.

He visited Moscow on February 24 and held talks with Vladimir Putin – the same day as tanks rolled into Ukraine.

His removal could trigger a political crisis that threatens to bring the country to the brink of chaos.

Rapists WILL be chemically castrated in Pakistan after PM tried to hang
Imran Khan blames women's clothing for rape and urges girls to cover up

The Assembly will now appoint a new Prime Minister.

This person can remain in power until October 2023 when the next elections are held.

Mr Khan becomes the first Pakistani Prime Minister to be ousted by a vote of no confidence.

The Supreme Court on Thursday ruled that Mr Khan, 69, acted unconstitutionally in blocking the no-confidence vote and dissolving parliament.

This infuriated several opposition figures, some accusing the prime minister of high treason.

Minutes before voting began, the speaker of Pakistan’s parliament – an ally of Mr Khan – announced his resignation.

Members of Mr Khan’s party exited the building, insisting he was the victim of an international conspiracy.

Opposition parties managed to get 174 votes in support of the no-confidence motion in the 342-strong House, the House Speaker said, making it a majority decision.

Khan’s Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) party was voted for by millions who grew up watching him play cricket, where he excelled as an all-rounder and led Pakistan to the 1992 World Cup title.

The PTI overthrew the decades-long dominance of the Pakistan Peoples Party (PPP) and the Pakistan Muslim League-N (PML-N) – two normally feuding groups that banded together to oust him.

Khan’s vision was to transform Pakistan into a welfare state modeled on the Islamic golden age of the 7th to 14th centuries, a period of cultural, economic and scientific prosperity in the Muslim world.

But he made little headway in improving Pakistan’s financial situation as runaway inflation, crippling debt and a weak rupee undermined economic reform.

The security situation has also deteriorated under his watch, especially since the Taliban returned to power in Afghanistan last year.

The Oxford-educated son of a wealthy Lahore family, Khan had a reputation as a playboy until his retirement from international cricket.

I fight to the very last ball. I never give up, whatever the outcome

Imran Khan

For years he engaged in charity projects, raising millions to build a cancer hospital in his mother’s honor.

He tiptoed into politics and for years held the PTI’s only seat in parliament.

But the party grew tremendously during the military-led government of General Pervez Musharraf, becoming a real force in the 2013 election before winning a majority five years later.

However, running the country proved more difficult than sitting in opposition.

Double-digit inflation has pushed up the cost of basic necessities, and although the economy is expected to grow 4 percent this year, it has stagnated for the past three years.

Pakistan has also had to borrow heavily just to service nearly $130 billion in foreign debt.

The increasingly unstable security situation, exemplified by the Taliban’s return to power across the border in mid-August, also contributed to Khan’s downfall.

The hard-line Islamists’ victory was initially seen as a victory both for Pakistan – who has long been accused of backing them – and for a prime minister known as “Taliban Khan” for his consistent pro-dialogue and criticism of US Policy towards Kabul.

But attacks by Pakistan’s Taliban — as well as local group Islamic State (IS-K) and ethnic Baluch separatists — have escalated despite Kabul’s assurances that Afghan soil would not be used for such purposes.

Pakistan’s army is key to political power and some analysts say Khan has lost his crucial support – claims both sides dispute.

Khan’s efforts to position Pakistan as a key, non-aligned regional player have also been successful.

Relations with the United States were crumbling, and Khan accused Washington of colluding with the opposition for regime change.

Islamabad has drawn closer to China, although vital work on the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) has slowed.

He also drew closer to Russia and angered the West by continuing a visit to Moscow on the same day as the invasion of Ukraine.

“I never give up”

Khan had some domestic success.

He is credited with getting Pakistan through the Covid-19 pandemic relatively unscathed, and a free universal healthcare system he pioneered is slowly being rolled out across the country.

Khan frequently rails against Western free movement, sparking outrage from rights groups by repeatedly linking rape to the way women dress in a deeply patriarchal country where sexual violence is rife.

Married three times, his current wife Bushra Bibi comes from a conservative family and wears a veil in public.

Often described as impulsive and brash, he frequently refers to cricket analogies to describe his political struggles.

“I fight to the very last ball. I never give up, whatever the outcome,” he said in an address to the nation last week.

Khan's supporters chant slogans in favor of their leader in front of the National Assembly

4

Khan’s supporters chant slogans in favor of their leader in front of the National AssemblyCredit: AP
Prime Minister Imran Khan was ousted from power

4

Prime Minister Imran Khan was ousted from powerCredit: AP

https://www.the-sun.com/news/5091338/ex-cricket-star-imran-khan-ousted/ Ex-cricket star Imran Khan became Pakistan’s prime minister after losing no-confidence vote

DevanCole

Daily Nation Today is an automatic aggregator of the all world’s media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – admin@dailynationtoday.com. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.

Related Articles

Back to top button