Conspiracy buffs are convinced this 85-year-old mural of colonial America “proves” time travel exists…can you see why?

There is something unexpected in this 1930s mural depicting a scene from 17th-century colonial America.

Some conspiracy fans are even convinced that it is evidence of time travel.

Mr. Pynchon and the Settlement of Springfield was painted by Umberto Romano in 1937

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Mr. Pynchon and the Settlement of Springfield was painted by Umberto Romano in 1937Credit: US Postal Service
Some viewers suspect that the 17th-century American is holding an iPhone

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Some viewers suspect that the 17th-century American is holding an iPhoneCredit: US Postal Service

The 1937 painting by Umberto Romano is called Mr Pynchon And The Settling Of Springfield.

It features English colonist and fur trader William Pynchon, best known for founding the town of Springfield, Massachusetts in 1636.

He is depicted trading with the Native Americans who lived in the area.

If you look closely, you can spot one of the men staring at a mysterious rectangular object in his right hand.

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Time travel is possible and

It seems strikingly similar to how people in the 21st century hold a smartphone and scroll down with their thumb.

The picture has left viewers stunned.

The mural – one of six in the Springfield Main Post Office – has not been altered since it was painted in 1937.

Artist Romano died in 1982, a quarter of a century before anyone had heard of an iPhone.

Some sleuths on the internet have offered this mural as proof that time travelers brought modern technology back in time.

However, others say the object may be a mirror, a commonly traded item in 17th-century New England.

Yesterday we shared how art fans were stunned when a “time traveler” held an iPhone in a painting from the 1860s.

In The Expected One by Ferdinand George Waldmüller, the woman seems engrossed in the object she is holding in both hands as she walks down a dirt road.

Experts say there is a more plausible explanation.

Peter Russell, whose observation sparked the conspiracy, told VICE, “What strikes me the most is how much a shift in technology has changed the interpretation of the painting and in some ways tapped into its full context.

“The great change is that in 1850 or 1860 any single viewer would have identified the object the girl is engrossed in as a hymnal or a prayer book.

“Today, no one can fail to see the resemblance to the scene of a teenage girl engrossed in social media on her smartphone.”

But it’s not the first time modern technology has allegedly been discovered in a centuries-old painting.

Apple CEO Tim Cook claimed he noticed an iPhone in a 350-year-old painting while visiting a museum in Amsterdam.

A man is seen clutching a rectangular object, while a woman, child, and dog also appear interested.

Cook said at a conference, “I always thought I knew when the iPhone was invented, but now I’m not so sure.”

The tech giant launched the first iPhone in 2007.

In The Expected One by Ferdinand George Waldmüller, a woman appears to be holding an iPhone

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In The Expected One by Ferdinand George Waldmüller, a woman appears to be holding an iPhonePhoto credit: WIKIMEDIA
Apple CEO Tim Cook claimed he spotted an iPhone in this 350-year-old painting

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Apple CEO Tim Cook claimed he spotted an iPhone in this 350-year-old paintingPhoto credit: Getty

https://www.the-sun.com/news/6374355/time-travel-mural-colonial-america-conspiracy/ Conspiracy buffs are convinced this 85-year-old mural of colonial America “proves” time travel exists…can you see why?

DevanCole

DevanCole is a Dailynationtoday U.S. News Reporter based in London. His focus is on U.S. politics and the environment. He has covered climate change extensively, as well as healthcare and crime. DevanCole joined Dailynationtoday in 2021 from the Daily Express and previously worked for Chemist and Druggist and the Jewish Chronicle. He is a graduate of Cambridge University. Languages: English. You can get in touch with me by emailing: devancole@dailynationtoday.com.

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