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Alps Murders police confirm re-arrest of ‘mystery cyclist’ seen speeding away from scene of Brit family’s murder decades ago

COPS has confirmed the re-arrest of a “mysterious motorcyclist” seen speeding away from the scene of the murder of a British family in the Alps a decade ago.

Businessman Surrey Saad al-Hilli, 50, his wife Iqbal, 47, and mother-in-law Suhaila al-Allaf, 74, were shot dead in a horrific attack in September 2012.

The car the Al-Hilli family was in when the attack happened

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The car the Al-Hilli family was in when the attack happened
Saad al-Hilli, along with his wife Iqbal and mother-in-law Suhaila al-Allaf, were shot down in a horrific attack

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Saad al-Hilli, along with his wife Iqbal and mother-in-law Suhaila al-Allaf, were shot down in a horrific attack
An e-fit photo of a'main suspect motorcyclist' released in November 2013

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An e-fit photo of a ‘main suspect motorcyclist’ released in November 2013

French cyclist Sylvain Mollier, 45, also died in a bloodbath, after being shot seven times at open range.

Prosecutors have now confirmed cyclist detained for death was first arrested and released seven years ago.

While declining to name him, attorneys on Wednesday said he was the “mysterious motorcyclist” seen driving away from the crime scene near Lake Annecy on September 5, 2015. 2012, and looks lost.

An e-fit photo of a “prime suspect motorcyclist” with a goatee was released in November 2013 and shows him wearing a distinctive black helmet in which Only about 8,000 pieces were made.

The image was primarily created by two rangers talking briefly to the man, which eventually led to the arrest of the first cyclist – a businessman from the French city of Lyon – in 2015.

He told police he was on his way home from a paragliding trip in the Alps and was released without charge.

But on Tuesday morning, the man was re-arrested at the home in Lyon he shared with his wife and child.

The initial detention period of 24 hours was extended on Wednesday because prosecutors said there was a “conflict with his alibi” that needed to be resolved.

He was being held on suspicion of murder and attempted murder when his defense attorney, Jean-Christophe Basson-Larbi, defended his innocence.

Mr. Basson-Larbi said: “This is a judicial error. My client is going through hell.”

Quoting his client directly, Mr. Basson-Larbi said: “This gentleman’s position has always been.

“I’m going for a walk, I’m in the area for some specific reason. The weather is fine, he’s wandering the streets he doesn’t know because he’s not using his GPS.

“He may have crossed the street with the motorists, but he did not cross the street with this poor family.”

The motorcyclist said he “made no connection” between his presence near the crime scene and the tram when it first entered traffic, and that’s why he We didn’t go at first.

However, investigators have now discovered the discrepancy in his testimony when interviewing him at a security police station in Chambery.

Zaid, his brother al-Hilli, who was born in Iraq, told The Sun Online he was “a bit surprised” by the arrest “completely unexpected for me” – as he concluded the French investigation. .

“I’d say hopefully this is the end but we’ve had a lot of red bangs over the last few years,” he said.

“The French investigation is not the best and now I think they just want to show that they are still investigating but it is too late.

“Anyone can see it, but the French are determined to go down dark alleys and try to cover up their initial mistakes.”

All three Britons killed were brutally ‘double-taped’ shots to the head by a professional gunman who was circling their parked BMW.

Al-Hillis’ daughter Zeena, four, hid under the car and was not injured, while her sister, Zainab, seven, was shot and beaten but recovered well.

GLOBAL DRIVER Investigating

The Bonnet-Mathis Order prosecutor has always stressed that the investigation is still very active.

In October, a lake near the crime scene has been blockaded as part of the investigation.

Referring to the village closest to the crime scene, Bonnet said at the time: “The Chevaline case is ongoing, and still involves an investigating judge and investigators.”

She confirmed that forensic officers had returned to the scene.

They were accompanied by local magistrates, who received orders to close the road for two 24-hour periods.

Their work is carried out under strict secrecy, with all traffic, including planes flying overhead, banned by court order.

“This is an opportunity for the new legal team to examine elements of the case, including inconsistencies in the witnesses’ wills,” another investigative source said.

When asked if a re-creation took place, the source said: “It’s not technically – it’s an opportunity for the team to get to know the scene more.”

Last year, detectives said they were investigating a possible link between murders and a gang of contract killers based in Paris.

The pistol rounds found at the home of one member – a former police intelligence officer – were of the same size as those from the antique Luger PO6 used to kill Al-Hillis.

Investigators believe that if the whole gang is involved, it is likely that the cyclist – Mr Mollier – is the prime target.

He is a welder in a subsidiary of nuclear power group Areva, but stresses in his personal life are more likely to have been the motive for making him a target, they said.

Zaid al-Hilli repeat his statement that Mollier was the target and that his relationships were merely bystanders.

“Obviously Mollier was the target my brother and his family were just tourists on vacation, they didn’t have an itinerary and were just walking along the breadcrumbs because they were on vacation but sadly it was on the wrong machine flew at the wrong time,” he said.

RED SUMMER

Confused French investigators looked at many other potential reasons for the attacks.

These range from Mr Al-Hilli’s past life in Iraq, including potential financial connections to the late dictator Saddam Hussein, to claims that a psychopath ‘lone wolf’ ‘ is the cause of a random attack.

But there’s no theory surrounding the so-called Alpine Murder that stuck, meaning there’s been no criminal indictment.

In September 2020, sisters Zainab and Zeena were again examined by the police in the hope that they would be able to come up with new relationships.

Police even probed Saad’s work on building military satellites as a motive and his brother, Zaid, 61, was asked about an alleged feud but said he wouldn’t have to. face any action.

A former French Army paratrooper who had an affair with Sylvain Mollier’s sister was the subject of the murder.

Patrice Menegaldo later committed suicide and remains the prime suspect in the 2012 murders.

He left a suicide note referring to the Alps Murders, following his interrogation by Chambery detectives.

Bonnet-Mathis prosecutors were “not allowed to go far” with the latest arrest.

“We had a suicide post-arrival in this case, so we have to be cautious and deliberate about its outcome,” she said.

“I don’t want to give away anything that identifies this person, or where he’s from.”

The site of the attack in the French Alps

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The site of the attack in the French AlpsCredit: Doug Seeburg – The Sun
Saad and Iqbal with their eldest daughter Zainab who was 3 years old at the time

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Saad and Iqbal with their eldest daughter Zainab who was 3 years old at the time
Police outside the al-Hilli family's Surrey home monitoring their murder

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Police outside the al-Hilli family’s Surrey home monitoring their murder
After all, the family murdered in the Alps were just innocent bystanders?

Patrice Menegaldo later committed suicide and remains the prime suspect in the 2012 murders.

He left a suicide note referring to the Alps Murders, following his interrogation by Chambery detectives.

Bonnet-Mathis prosecutors were “not allowed to go far” with the latest arrest.

“We had a suicide post-arrival in this case, so we have to be cautious and deliberate about its outcome,” she said.

“I don’t want to give away anything that identifies this person, or where he’s from.”

https://www.the-sun.com/news/4454359/alps-murders-rearrest-mystery-biker-brit-family/ Alps Murders police confirm re-arrest of ‘mystery cyclist’ seen speeding away from scene of Brit family’s murder decades ago

DevanCole

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